Skip to main content

Extending the classification of healthcare-associated bloodstream infection to other main foci: respiratory, urinary and intra-abdominal

Introduction

Healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) is a growing phenomena associated with the increase of the outpatient clinical care. Friedman in 2002 proposed a new classification for healthcare-associated bloodstream infections, suggesting that they are different from nosocomial and community-acquired infections [1]. The authors extend this classification to other main focus of infection: respiratory, urinary and intra-abdominal.

Methods

A prospective cohort study (1 year), in five wards of a university hospital, including all consecutive adult patients that met the CDC definition of infection. Only the first episode of infection was characterized. They were classified in community-acquired (CAI), HCAI (using Friedman's classification [1]) and hospital-acquired (HAI), and data on the host and the infectious episode were collected.

Results

See Figure 1. We included 1,035 patients: 493 (48%) with CAI, 225 (22%) with HCAI and 317 (31%) with HAI.

Figure 1
figure1

Microbiological profile according to the focus of infection.

Conclusions

Differences were observed according to the type and focus of infection. These results reinforce the need for this classification and probably the need for specific antibiotic therapy guidelines for this group of patients.

References

  1. 1.

    Friedman ND, et al.: Ann Intern Med. 2002, 137: 791-797.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to C Cardoso.

Rights and permissions

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Cardoso, C., Ribeiro, O., Aragão, I. et al. Extending the classification of healthcare-associated bloodstream infection to other main foci: respiratory, urinary and intra-abdominal. Crit Care 15, P214 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1186/cc9634

Download citation

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Cohort Study
  • Adult Patient
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Antibiotic Therapy