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Blood glucose control during cardiac surgery: an evaluation of a fixed versus a variable insulin regime

Introduction

Intensive insulin therapy (blood glucose < 6.1 mmol/l) may reduce mortality after cardiac surgery (by 42%) [1]. An effective regime would keep blood glucose < 6 mmol/l for 80% of the time; < 8 for 90% of the time and <12 for 99% of the time, and no hypos (< 3.0).

Method

Ninety elective heart surgery patients were recruited, and randomly allocated a 'Fixed' regimen (F) (Table 1) or a 'Variable' regimen (V) (Table 2) (n = 45). Blood sugars were recorded 1–2 hourly postoperatively for 48 hours. In each patient the mean and standard deviation were calculated. Episodes of hypoglycaemia (< 3 mmol/l), and mild (6.1–8.0), moderate (8.1–12) or severe (>12) hyperglycaemia were identified.

Table 1 (abstract P379)
Table 2 (abstract P379)

Results and conclusion

The variable better controlled blood glucose (V = 6.5 ± 0.74; F = 7.0 ± 0.90) (P = 0.004) especially in patients with a high BMI (> 25) (Fig. 1). There were more hypos in F (n = 4) than V (n = 1). Glucose < 6 mmol/l was found for 33% of the time in F, 48% in V; < 8 mmol/l for 75% in F and 82% in V; <12 mmol/l for 99% in F and 99% in V.

Figure 1
figure1

(abstract P379)

References

  1. 1.

    Van den Berghe G, et al.: Intensive insulin therapy in the critically ill patients. N Engl J Med 2001, 345: 1359-1367. 10.1056/NEJMoa011300

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Vohra, A., Chan, A. & Odom, N. Blood glucose control during cardiac surgery: an evaluation of a fixed versus a variable insulin regime. Crit Care 9, P379 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1186/cc3442

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Keywords

  • Sugar
  • Blood Glucose
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Hypo
  • Blood Sugar