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  • Meeting abstract
  • Open Access

Continuous insufflation of oxygen (CIO) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): preliminary results of a randomised controlled trial

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Critical Care20026(Suppl 1):P163

https://doi.org/10.1186/cc1622

Published: 1 March 2002

Keywords

  • Oxygen
  • Randomise Control Trial
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Cardiac Arrest
  • Multicentre Trial

Introduction

The use of CIO through a special 'Boussignac' endotracheal tube during CPR for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been shown to be as efficient as standard manual ventilation and chest compression in terms of immediate resuscitation [1]. A multicentre trial was therefore undertaken to compare the outcome associated with CIO-CPR versus standard CPR. We report the preliminary results concerning the respective efficacy of the two techniques on oxygenation.

Methods

An independent Ethics Committee has approved the protocol. All patients were randomised to receive either CIO-CPR with no intermittent ventilation or standard CPR. Pulse oximetry (SpO2) was recorded every 5 min until recovery or death. The number of patients with a reliable SpO2 signal and the mean values of SpO2 were compared between the two groups (Chi-square and Student's t-test).

Results

Between August 2000 and April 2001, 430 patients with a mean age of 64 ± 14 years have been included in the study, with 208 patients in the standard-CPR group and 222 in the ICO-CPR. The Table shows the percentage of patients with measurable SpO2 values, significantly larger in the ICO-CPR group (*P < 0.05).

Table

SpO2 signal

T 5

T 10

T 15

T 20

T 25

T 30

Standard-CPR(%)

38

42

41

37

34

29

CIO-CPR (%)

50*

51*

50*

49*

41*

39*

The measured values were always significantly higher in the ICO-CPR group (T 10: 78 ± 29 vs 68 ± 27%, T 15 78 ± 22 vs 71 ± 26%).

Conclusion

In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the CIO-CPR technique offers an attractive alternative to standard CPR since it does not need any intermittent ventilation and allows a better oxygenation. The study is still ongoing with a lack of difference in outcome.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Hôpital Henri Mondor, Paris, France

References

  1. Saïssy J-M, Boussignac G, Cheptel E, Rouvin B, Fontaine D, Bargues L, Levecque J-P, Michel A, Brochard L: Efficacy of continuous insufflation of oxygen combined with active cardiac compression-decompression during out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest. Anesthesiology 2000, 92: 1523-1530. 10.1097/00000542-200006000-00007View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Biomed central limited 2001

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