Volume 19 Supplement 2

Eighth International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine for Latin America

Open Access

Neck circumference as a complementary measure to identify risk of excess body mass in children younger than 2 years old

  • Daniela dos Santos1,
  • Aila Aparecida Farias1,
  • Caroline Kroll1,
  • Katherinne B Wanis Figueirêdo1,
  • Marco Fábio Mastroeni1,
  • Mayte Bertoli1,
  • Sandra Ana Czarnobay1 and
  • Silmara S de BS Mastroeni1
Critical Care201519(Suppl 2):P31

https://doi.org/10.1186/cc14683

Published: 28 September 2015

Objective

To evaluate the effectiveness of neck circumference (NC) as a measure for assessing risk of excess body mass in children aged 13-24 months.

Methods

From a total of 435 children born in 2012 in a public maternity hospital of Joinville, Brazil, 279 participated in a new investigation 1 year later. Body mass, length and NC were collected in their homes between March 2013 and March 2014. The best cutoff value for identifying overweight/obese children using the body mass index (BMI) was determined by the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC curve), according to gender and the age groups: 13-15 months, 16-19 months and 20-24 months.

Results

NC was positive and significant. The NC cutoff points increased with increasing age group in boys (23.6, 23.9 and 24.0 cm) and girls (23.4, 23.5 and 23.6 cm), respectively, for the 13-15, 16-19 and 20-24 age groups. See Tables 1, 2, 3, 4.
Table 1

General characteristics of the children according to BMI category and sex, Joinville, SC, Brazil, 2013-2014.

Characteristic

BMI ≤P85

BMI >P85

p value

Boys

(n = 82)

(n = 60)

 

  Age (months)

16.1 (3.1)

17.4 (3.1)

0.004

  Body mass (kg)

10,433.1 (1124.7)

12,839.7 (1792.8)

<0.001

  Length (cm)

79.8 (4.1)

81.1 (4.2)

0.063

  BMI (kg/m2)

16.3 (1.0)

19.4 (1.4)

<0.001

  NC (cm)a

23.4 (1.3)

25.2 (1.5)

<0.001

Girls

(n = 81)

(n = 56)

 

  Age (months)

16.0 (3.1)

16.9 (3.2)

0.037

  Body mass (kg)

9834.5 (1237.6)

11,772.6 (1524.7)

<0.001

  Length (cm)

78.4 (4.2)

78.7 (4.3)

0.443

  BMI (kg/m2)

15.9 (0.9)

18.9 (1.4)

<0.001

  NC (cm)b

22.9 (1.3)

24.7 (1.5)

<0.001

aBMI ≤P85, n = 81; BMI >P85, n = 58

bBMI ≤P85, n = 80

Table 2

Relationship between neck circumference (NC) and age, body mass, length and BMI by sex, Joinville, SC, Brazil, 2013-2014.

Characteristic

NC

 

Boys

Girls

 

rho

p value

rho

p value

Age

0.024

0.778

0.124

0.151

Body mass

0.520

<0.001

0.660

<0.001

Length

0.117

0.172

0.358

<0.001

BMI

0.635

<0.001

0.606

<0.001

Table 3

Spearman correlation coefficients (rho) of the relation between BMI and neck circumference (NC) by age and sex, Joinville, SC, Brazil, 2013-2014

Age (months)

n

BMI-NC

  

rho

p value

Boys

   

  13−15

65

0.604

<0.001

  16−19

44

0.663

<0.001

  20−24

30

0.719

<0.001

Girls

   

  13−15

73

0.642

<0.001

  16−19

30

0.419

0.021

  20−24

33

0.604

<0.001

Table 4

Area under the curve (AUC), frequency (n), optimal cutoff points, sensitivities and specificities for neck circumference (NC) associated with excess body mass in three age groups of boys and girls, Joinville, SC, Brazil, 2013-2014.

Age (months)

n

AUC (95 % CI)

Cutoff

Sensitivity (%)

Specificity (%)

Boys

     

  13−15

65

0.796 (0.683−0.909)

23.6

85.0

48.9

  16−19

44

0.876 (0.771−0.981)

23.9

81.8

63.6

  20−24

30

0.902 (0.000−1.000)

24.0

75.0

92.9

Girls

     

  13−15

73

0.814 (0.709−0.919)

23.4

73.1

61.7

  16−19

30

0.697 (0.509−0.885)

23.5

76.9

52.9

  20−24

33

0.796 (0.644−0.947)

23.6

76.5

68.7

CI confidence interval

Conclusion

Our results suggest that NC can also be used to screen risk of excess body mass and upper fat distribution in children aged 13-24 months. However, further studies with a larger sample in order to complement our data will be required.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Universidade da Região de Joinville--Univille

Copyright

© Santos et al.; 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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