Volume 19 Supplement 1

35th International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Open Access

Do intensivists prognosticate patients differently from themselves or their loved ones?

  • S Gupta1,
  • C Green1,
  • R Tiruvoipati1 and
  • J Botha1
Critical Care201519(Suppl 1):P569

https://doi.org/10.1186/cc14649

Published: 16 March 2015

Introduction

There is a paucity of data about whether our treatment philosophy is different for our patients as compared with what we would have wanted for ourselves, or while acting as surrogate decision-makers for our loved ones.

Methods

An anonymous survey was sent to all the members of Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society and the College of Intensive Care Medicine (CICM). The first section comprised a hypothetical case scenario spanning over 6 weeks of ICU stay for a patient. At four different stages of the ICU stay, responders were requested to answer multiple-choice questions regarding the philosophy of treatment, based on their perceived prognosis of the patient at that particular time. The following two sections contained the same set of questions with the hypothetical scenario of responders acting as surrogate decision-makers for the patient and that of responders being patients themselves, in the same situation. The responses were compared amongst three sections at each stage using the chi-square test.

Results

A total of 115 responses were received from the fellows of CICM. The results are presented in Tables 1 and 2.
Table 1

Respondents advocating withdrawal for the patient.

 

Withdrawal self (%)

Withdrawal family (%)

Day 3

71

67

Day 7

83

76

Day 28

96

88

Day 42

98

97

Table 2

Respondents advocating continuing care for the patient.

 

Withdrawal self (%)

Withdrawal family (%)

Day 3

16

10

Day 7

23

15

Day 14

25

19

Day 42

42

29

Conclusion

Of the ICU physicians who would withdraw care for their patient, the majority would also want the same for themselves. The disparity between decision to continue to treat the patients versus treating self or family increased with increasing length of stay.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Peninsula Health

References

  1. Korones DN: What would you do if it were your kid?. N Engl J Med. 2013, 369: 1291-3. 10.1056/NEJMp1304941.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Gupta et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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