Skip to main content

Near-infrared spectroscopy for assessing the tissue oxygen extraction rate during sepsis: relationship with outcome

Introduction

Microcirculatory dysfunction impairs tissue oxygenation during sepsis. We applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to evaluate the tissue oxygen extraction rate in sepsis and its relationship with outcome.

Methods

A prospective observational study; 14 septic patients underwent NIRS monitoring (thenar eminence) with a vascular occlusion test (using a 40% StO2 target) at admission to the ICU. Healthy volunteers (n = 27) were studied as controls. The slope of the desaturation curve was assessed separately for the first (StO2 down1) and the last part (StO2 down2) of the curve and the difference between, Down2 - Down1, was calculated.

Results

StO2 Down1 was lower in healthy volunteers as compared with septic patients (P < 0.05); no difference was seen between ICU survivors (n = 7) and nonsurvivors (n = 7). StO2 Down2 was similar between healthy volunteers and ICU survivors, while it was higher in nonsurvivors (P < 0.01 vs. healthy). ICU nonsurvivors showed higher Down2 - Down1 as compared with ICU survivors (P < 0.01, Figure 1).

figure1

Figure 1

Conclusion

Tissue oxygen extraction was reduced in septic patients. Nonsurvivors showed a flattening in the last part of the desaturation curve during a VOT, while the first part of the StO2 downslope did not show any difference between survivors and nonsurvivors. This may reflect a tissue hypometabolic status, which may be better elicited in the final part of the ischemic challenge.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Donati, A., Damiani, E., Scorcella, C. et al. Near-infrared spectroscopy for assessing the tissue oxygen extraction rate during sepsis: relationship with outcome. Crit Care 19, P143 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1186/cc14223

Download citation

Keywords

  • Healthy Volunteer
  • Septic Patient
  • Prospective Observational Study
  • Final Part
  • Vascular Occlusion