Skip to main content

High-frequency ventilation for acute traumatic and nontraumatic lung injury

Introduction

ARDS is commonly observed in trauma patients. In some instances the severity of the clinical presentation is such that all conventional ventilatory support mode fails. In this setting, high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) was considered mostly a rescue therapy.

Methods

Fifteen adult patients admitted to our ICU for acute traumatic and nontraumatic lung injury were submitted to HFOV when conventional mechanical ventilation failed.

Results

Clinical and demographic data are shown in Table 1. Figure 1 shows the trend of gas parameters during the recovery. At baseline PaO2 was 94 ± 28 mmHg; after 6 hours of HFOV: 135 ± 41 mmHg, P < 0.01. At baseline PaO2/FiO2 was 182 ± 97 mmHg; after 6 hours of HFOV: 264 ± 101 mmHg, P < 0.01. The benefits are maintained when returned to conventional ventilation.

Table 1 Clinical and demographic data
Figure 1
figure1

Mean PaO 2 , PaCO 2 , PaO 2 /FiO 2 at baseline and during HFOV (P, percussionator; C, conventional). *P <0.05 versus baseline, P <0.01 versus baseline.

Conclusion

HFOV may therefore be anticipated to improve end-organ perfusion and gas exchange; it should be considered in severe traumatic and nontraumatic respiratory failure [1].

References

  1. 1.

    BMJ. 2010, 340: c2327. 10.1136/bmj.c2327

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to R Varutti.

Rights and permissions

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Varutti, R., Bigai, R., Fiorillo, M. et al. High-frequency ventilation for acute traumatic and nontraumatic lung injury. Crit Care 17, P120 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1186/cc12058

Download citation

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Mechanical Ventilation
  • Adult Patient
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Demographic Data