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Necrotizing pneumonia due to methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus secreting Panton-Valentine leukocidin: a review of case reports

Introduction

Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-secreting Staphylococcus aureus is a highly lethal infection, which mainly affects healthy children and young adults [1, 2]. This study focuses on necrotizing pneumonia due to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus strains, with the purpose to determine factors associated with outcome.

Methods

We performed a systematic review of case reports on PVL-secreting MSSA necrotizing pneumonia and analyzed factors associated with outcome.

Results

A total of 32 patient descriptions were retained for analysis. Septic shock, influenza-like prodrome and the absence of a previous skin and soft tissue infection were associated with fatal outcome. In multivariate analysis, influenza-like prodrome (OR 7.44; 95% CI: 1.24 to 44.76; P = 0.028) and absence of previous skin and soft tissue infection (OR 0.09; 95% CI: 0.010 to 0.86; P = 0.036) remained significant predictors of death. See Table 1.

Table 1 Univariate analysis of mortality risk factors

Conclusion

Influenza-like prodrome may be predictive of adverse outcome and previous skin and soft tissue infection may be associated with improved prognosis.

References

  1. 1.

    Gillet Y, et al.: Lancet. 2002, 359: 753-759. 10.1016/S0140-6736(02)07877-7

  2. 2.

    Gillet Y, et al.: Clin Infect Dis. 2007, 45: 315-321. 10.1086/519263

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Author information

Correspondence to L Kreienbuehl.

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Kreienbuehl, L., Charbonney, E. & Eggimann, P. Necrotizing pneumonia due to methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus secreting Panton-Valentine leukocidin: a review of case reports. Crit Care 16, P42 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1186/cc10649

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Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Systematic Review
  • Pneumonia
  • Young Adult