Volume 2 Supplement 1

18th International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Open Access

Does Tendelenburg position and sheet covering of the face affect respiratory function in cardiac patient?

  • M Bertolissi1,
  • F Bassi1,
  • D Petrei1 and
  • F Giordano1
Critical Care19982(Suppl 1):P123

https://doi.org/10.1186/cc252

Published: 1 March 1998

The Tendelenburg position (TP) and the sterile sheet covering of the face (SCF) are two manoeuvres routinely employed to cannulate a central vein and position the Swan-Ganz catheter. The two manoeuvres however can interfere with the respiratory function, decreasing the functional residual capacity, redistributing the pulmonary blood flow and favouring the rebreathing of the expired gases [1]. In this study we evaluated the impact of the two manoeuvres on the respiratory gas exchange in the cardiac patient.

Method

We studied 50 cardiosurgical premedicated patients without respiratory disease and we divided them into 5 groups: Group A1 = 10 elective coronary patients (CP) with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >45% supplied with O2 40% by a ventimask; Group A2 = 10 CP with LVEF >45% breathing room-air; Group B1 = 10 CP with LVEF <45% supplied with O2 40%; Group B2 = 10 CP with LV EF <45% breathing room-air; Group C = 10 end stage heart disease patients with LVEF <30% undergoing heart trasplantation, supplied with O2 40%. Before induction of anaesthesia all patients were placed in TP (30°) and had their face completely covered by sterile sheets, to cannulate the internal jugular vein and position the Swan-Ganz catheter. The arterial blood samples to measure oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide (PaCO2) tension were drawn: before TP and SCF (Time 1), before removing TP (with SCF) (Time 2), before removing SCF (without TP) (Time 3), 5 min after SCF removal (Time 4). Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA test, significant for P< 0.05.

Results

The main results are reported in Table 1. There are no significant differences among the five groups in the times applied for TP and SCF.

Discussion

The analysis of our data shows that: a) the association of TP and SCF (time 1 versus time 2) caused a significant increase in PaO2 in all patients receiving O2 and a small and not significant decrease in patients breathing room-air; b) The removal of TP (time 2 versus time 3) caused a small increase in PaO2 in all groups but group C who showed a significant increase in PaO2; c) the SCF (time 1 versus time 3) induced a significant increase in PaO2 in all patients receiving supplemental O2 and a small and not significant increase in patients breathing room-air. We did not observe any significant change in PaCO2 values in all groups.

We conclude that the TP and the SCF, frequently employed in anaesthesia, ICU and emergency medicine, ensure a good respiratory gas exchange in cardiac patient, even when supplemental O2 is not supplied or LVEF is markedly reduced.
Table 1

PaO2 and PaCO2 values recorded at the four times

Times

 

1

2

3

4

PaO2

A1

111.9± 28

147.2 ± 41*

157± 42

116 ± 25*

 

A2

78.6 ± 8

78.1 ± 8

82.7 ± 9

78.7 ± 14

 

B1

97.8 ± 17

146.5 ± 33*

156.6 ± 40

102.5 ± 13*

 

B2

87.9 ± 19

82 ± 12

88.2 ± 10

86.7 ± 10

 

C

144.8 ± 27

208.7 ± 35*

233.7 ± 37*

152.2 ± 31*

PaCO2

A1

40.1 ± 4

40.3 ± 4

41.2 ± 4

40 ± 5

 

A2

40.9 ± 3

41.3 ± 4

41.1 ± 5

41.1 ± 5

 

B1

40.1 ± 5

41.6 ± 5

43.6 ± 6

43.8 ± 7

 

B2

38.9 ± 4

40.8 ± 4

40.6 ± 5

38.5 ± 3

 

C

36.3 ± 6

37 ± 5

36.3 ± 4

35.6 ± 5

*P < 0.05 versus the previous value within each group

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Anaesthesia and ICU 2°, Azienda Ospedaliera

References

  1. Cardio-respiratory effects of change of body position. Can Anesth Soc J. 1983, 4: 424-Google Scholar

Copyright

© Current Science Ltd 1998

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