Volume 11 Supplement 3

Fourth International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine for Latin America

Open Access

Base excess and early mortality in patients admitted to the general intensive care unit at a university hospital in Fortaleza

  • FA de Meneses1,
  • ISAM Bezerra1,
  • E Ribeiro1,
  • AH FurtadoJunior1 and
  • AA PeixotoJunior1
Critical Care200711(Suppl 3):P13

https://doi.org/10.1186/cc5800

Published: 19 June 2007

Introduction

Base excess is considered an indicator of injury, shock and adequate resuscitation. We looked to establish a relation between base excess and serum bicarbonate obtained on admission to the ICU and the prognostics of patients.

Methods

A retrospective study with analysis of 110 patients admitted consecutively to the ICU, during the period June–December 2006.

Figure 1

Results

Of the 110 patients, there was a predominance of women and mean age 54.2 ± 18.7 years. The length of stay in the ICU was 6.5 ± 7.4 days and the mean APACHE II index, at the first 24 hours of admission, was 21.0 ± 8.1 points. Most patients survived (71.9%), 9.3% died during the first 48 hours in the ICU and 18.6% after 48 hours from admission to this unit. The standardized mortality ratio was 0.715. Patients with early mortality, during the first 48 hours in the ICU, had lower base excess (-7.75 ± 8.33 vs -3.17 ± 5.43) and serum bicarbonate (16.7 ± 6.2 vs 20.9 ± 5.6) than survivors (P < 0.05). Patients with permanence in the ICU up to 7 days and patients that stayed in this unit for more than 7 days had similar base excess and serum bicarbonate (-3.24 ± 5.37 vs -2.98 ± 5.72 and 20.9 ± 5.3 vs 20.9 ± 6.3) (P > 0.05).

Conclusion

Serum bicarbonate and base excess were associated with early mortality during the ICU stay. However, these parameters did not correlate with ICU length of stay.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Federal University of Ceará – UFC, Intensive Care Unit

Copyright

© BioMed Central Ltd 2007

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