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  • Poster presentation
  • Open Access

Recognition and management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in Australasia

  • 1,
  • 1 and
  • 1
Critical Care200610 (Suppl 1) :P299

https://doi.org/10.1186/cc4646

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Hypertension
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Measurement Method
  • Organ Dysfunction

Objective

To determine ICU awareness regarding measurement of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), features of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), and management of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS).

Methods

The survey explored experience, measurement methods and understanding of IAP, causes of IAH and management of ACS.

Results

Ninety-two percent of the ICU Registrars used IAP but 52% only infrequently. While 90% understood that IAP can cause rises in intraperitoneal pathology, retroperitoneal causation of IAH was poorly understood. Ninety-two percent correctly said that ACS should be treated by abdominal decompression. Only 70% of our respondents would not perform CT of the abdomen predecompression. Thirty-three percent erroneously said that they would treat IAP >30 mmHg regardless of organ dysfunction and another 22% were unsure of the threshold of therapy for ACS.

Conclusion

Australasian Fellows appreciate IAP measurements and manage ACS appropriately. Retroperitoneal causes of IAH and the threshold for treatment for ACS were poorly understood.

Table 1

No.

Question

Yes (%)

No (%)

Unsure (%)

1

IAP is measured by instilling 50 ml saline into the Foley catheter and then transducing the pressure

50

16

34

2

IAP rises due to intraperitoneal pathology

95

0

5

3

IAP rises due to retroperitoneal pathology

56

22

22

4

IAH is an epiphenomenon and not a phenomenon

16

16

68

5

IAH + organ dysfunction defines ACS

69

9

22

6

ACS should be treated regardless of the IAP

63

13

24

7

ACS is an epiphenomenon and not a phenomenon

13

38

49

8

ACS should be treated only if there is lactic acidosis

3

83

14

9

Before treating ACS, a contrast-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen should always be done

9

71

20

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne, Australia

Copyright

© BioMed Central Ltd 2006

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