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Bacteremia mortality according to microorganism responsible and origin source of bacteremia in critically ill patients

Objective

To determine the incidence, microorganism responsible and mortality of bacteremias in critically ill patients. To analyze bacteremia mortality according to microorganisms responsible and origin sources in critically ill patients.

Methods

It is a prospective study of bacteremias in patients admitted in a medical–surgical ICU, from 1 May 2000 to 31 August 2002. We analyzed mortality bacteremia according to the microorganism responsible and bacteremia mortality according to origin sources. The statistical analysis was realized by chi-square test and we took values P < 0.05 to consider a significant difference.

Results

Included were 1389 patients. Diagnosed were 116 bacteremias, due to 116 microorganisms, in 106 patients (a total of 7.63% patients developed bacteremia). The mortality of patients who developed bacteremia was 19.81% (21/106). Bacteremia mortality for each microorganism responsible was: MRSA 1/9, MSSA 3/5, CNS 6/44, Streptococcus faecalis 2/13, Streptococcus pneumoniae 1/4, Escherichia coli 3/8, Proteus mirabilis 0/2, klebsiella 2/4, Morganella morgani 0/2, acinetobacter 0/1, enterobacter 1/7, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1/7, Candida albicans 1/4, others 0/6. Bacteremia mortality for each origin source was: primary 9/55, respiratory 6/25, central venous catheter 5/22, wound surgical 1/4, others 0/10. No significant differences were found in bacteremia mortality according to the microorganism responsible and according to origin source of bacteremia.

Conclusions

In our series, bacteremia mortality was not different according to origin source nor according to the microorganism responsible.

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Lorente, L., Galvan, R., Martín, M. et al. Bacteremia mortality according to microorganism responsible and origin source of bacteremia in critically ill patients. Crit Care 7, P138 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1186/cc2027

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/cc2027

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Escherichia Coli
  • Catheter
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Pseudomonas Aeruginosa