Skip to main content

Risk factors and molecular typing associated with colonization or infection by a multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa in intensive care unit (ICU) patients

Background

Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are associated with high mortality. Ps. aeruginosa has developed, after many years, multidrug resistance. We conducted a retrospective study to identify risks factors associated with acquisition of MDR Ps. aeruginosa in ICU patients.

Methods

A retrospective study was performed in the 12-bed medico-surgical ICU from January to December 2000. All charts corresponding to acquisition of Ps. aeruginosa were reviewed; among them, we compare patients with or without a MDR strain. The MDR strains were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and were defined as resistance to at least three drugs among ciprofloxacin (CIP), amikacin, ceftazidim and imipenem.

Results

Six hundred and ninety-nine patients were admitted to the ICU during the study period. Fifty-two (7.5%) had a colonization or an infection with Ps. aeruginosa during their ICU stay. Forty (77%) had a susceptible strain and 12 (23%) had a MDR strain. Alcoholism was more frequent in the MDR group (P = 0.047). The previous use of CIP, cefuroxime (CEF) and bitherapy with cefepime (CEP) plus amikacin were identified as a risk factor associated with acquisition of a MDR Ps. aeruginosa (for CIP, P = 0.0012; for CEF, P = 0.03; and for bitherapy, P = 0.026). No clonal strain was identified by PFGE.

Conclusions

The previous use of some broad-spectrum antibiotics was associated with development of MDR Ps. aeruginosa. Control prescriptions and optimizing use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is now established in our hospital to reduce the risk of emergence of MDR strains.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Milas, S., Piagnerelli, M., Vanhaeverbeek, M. et al. Risk factors and molecular typing associated with colonization or infection by a multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Crit Care 7, P124 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1186/cc2013

Download citation

  • Published:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/cc2013

Keywords

  • Intensive Care Unit
  • Pseudomonas Aeruginosa
  • Amikacin
  • Intensive Care Unit Patient
  • Imipenem