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Usefulness of extravascular lung water assessment as a predictor of weaning from mechanical ventilation

Introduction

Quantitative measurement of extravascular lung water (EVLW) would be extremely useful for clinical management, both as an index of severity and to guide treatment lung ultrasonography (LU) as a tool to quantify EVLW.

Methods

Forty mechanically ventilated patients were examined for 5 successive days after being eligible for weaning; counting B-lines (comets) in both lung fields by LU, peak airway pressure, plateau airway pressure, static compliance and ABG analysis every 6 hours. Patients were divided into two groups according to success of the weaning process: group A (weaned group), and group B (nonweaned group).

Results

The median value of LU comets was significantly lower in Group A compared with Group B. There was a significant increase in hypoxic index in Group A compared with Group B. There was no significant difference between both groups as regards PIP, while Pplat showed a significant increase in Group B compared with Group A and Cs showed a significant decrease in Group B.

Conclusion

LU is a useful to quantify EVLW; it is a good predictor of weaning.

References

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Zidan, D., Okasha, A., Megahed, M. et al. Usefulness of extravascular lung water assessment as a predictor of weaning from mechanical ventilation. Crit Care 19, P258 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1186/cc14338

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Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Mechanical Ventilation
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Good Predictor
  • Quantitative Measurement