Volume 5 Supplement 1

21st International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Open Access

Trends in post-operative mortality in patients requiring renal replacement therapy following cardiothoracic transplantation

  • M Ostermann1,
  • R Chang1,
  • L Reynolds2,
  • A Murday2,
  • B Madden2 and
  • S Nelson1
Critical Care20015(Suppl 1):P220

https://doi.org/10.1186/cc1287

Received: 15 January 2001

Published: 2 March 2001

Renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) increases mortality after any operation. Cardiothoracic surgery carries a high risk of post-operative renal failure, but the effect of the management of RRT on mortality is unclear in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the changes in mortality over a 15-year period in patients requiring RRT following cardiothoracic transplantation. We performed a retrospective review of all 406 patients who received a heart (n = 359) or lung (n = 49) transplant in a single tertiary care centre from November 1986 to October 1999. Two patients underwent a second heart transplantation and one patient received a combined heart/renal transplant during this period.

The requirement for RRT has not significantly altered over the time period of the study. However there has been a dramatic reduction in the 30-day mortality in patients treated with RRT which is sustained through to the end of the first year. This is likely to be due to earlier implementation of RRT with its associated improvements in nutrition and homeostasis.

Table 1

  

30-Day

1-Year

 

Need for RRT

mortality in

mortality in

 

in first

patients

patients

Date of Tx

30 days

requiring RRT

requiring RRT

1986–1990

12/71

10/12

11/12

 

(16.9%)

(83.3%)

(91.1%)

1991–1995

29/202

19/29

24/29

 

(14.4%)

(65.5%)

(82.8%)

1996–10/1999

26/135

11/26

15/26

 

(19.3%)

(42.3%)

(57.7%)

1986–10/1999

67/408

40/65

50/65

 

(16.4%)

(61.5%)

(76.9%)

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Renal Unit, St George's Hospital
(2)
Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit, St George's Hospital

Copyright

© The Author(s) 2001

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