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Table 4 Distress and moral distress during COVID-19 pandemic

From: Palliative care practice and moral distress during COVID-19 pandemic (PEOpLE-C19 study): a national, cross-sectional study in intensive care units in the Czech Republic

  Results
(N = 313)
Major sources of distress*, n (%)
 Spending less time with patients 168 (53.7)
 Inconsistent opinions of physicians regarding comfort care 133 (42.5)
 Insufficient communication with patient’s family 74 (23.6)
 Inconsistent opinions of nurses on comfort care 72 (23.0)
 Insufficient communication about goals of treatment within the team 69 (22.0)
I was exposed to moral distress during the COVID-19 pandemic, n (%)
 Strongly agree 75 (24.0)
 Somewhat agree 87 (27.8)
 Do not know 23 (7.3)
 Somewhat disagree 92 (29.4)
 Strongly disagree 28 (8.9)
 Median (IQR) 2 (2–4)
Level of moral distress was comparable to situation before COVID-19 pandemic, n (%)a
 Strongly agree 5 (3.1)
 Somewhat agree 24 (14.8)
 Do not know 11 (6.8)
 Somewhat disagree 82 (50.6)
 Strongly disagree 39 (24.1)
Major sources of moral distress*, n (%)a
 Work intensity—psychological exhaustion 27 (16.7)
 Work intensity—physical exhaustion 23 (14.2)
 Cooperation with not qualified colleagues 20 (12.3)
 Changes in the standards of care 19 (11.7)
 Severity of condition/prognosis of admitted patients 16 (9.9)
 Personal interactions at the ICU 16 (9.9)
 Prioritisation of care due to resource scarcity situation 16 (9.9)
 Responsibility for insufficiently qualified colleagues 14 (8.6)
 Work intensity—risk of infection 10 (6.2)
 Organisational/institutional problems 6 (3.7)
 Administration of experimental treatments 5 (3.1)
  1. COVID-19 Coronavirus disease, IQR interquartile range, ICU intensive care unit
  2. aPercentage based on number of HCPs who answered ‘Strongly agree’ or ‘Somewhat agree’ on the question ‘I was exposed to moral distress during the Covid-19 pandemic’
  3. *More than one answer possible