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Table 1 Baseline characteristic of patients who had initially nonshockable arrest rhythms

From: Subsequent shock deliveries are associated with increased favorable neurological outcomes in cardiac arrest patients who had initially non-shockable rhythms

  Subsequently Subsequently  
Not Shockeda Shockedb
  (n = 10,960) (n = 521) P value
Age (years) 71.2 (16.9) 68.0 (16.5) <0.0001
Sex (% male) 58.5 65.3 0.0024
Public location (%) 18.8 20.9 0.24
Witnessed arrest (%) 42.2 54.5 <0.0001
Bystander CPR (%) 30.7 28.1 0.21
Call–response interval (minutes) 8.0 (3.6) 8.2 (3.8) 0.18
Initial rhythm PEA (n (%)) 2455 (22.4) 229 (44.0) <0.0001
Initial rhythm asystole (n (%)) 8505 (77.6) 292 (56.0) <0.0001
Shock delivery time (minutes) 13.0 (9.8) N/A
Etiology (n (%))    
 Cardiac 4748 (43.3) 331 (63.5) <0.0001
 Noncardiac 6212 (56.7) 190 (36.5)  
 Asphyxia 1469(13.4) 39 (7.5)  
 Trauma 928 (8.5) 11 (2.1)  
 Aortic disease 569 (5.2) 24 (4.6)  
 Drowning 447 (4.1) 12 (2.3)  
 Cerebrovascular disease 267 (2.4) 11 (2.1)  
 Drug overdose 72 (0.7) 3 (0.6)  
 Others or unknown 2460 (22.2) 90 (17.3)  
  1. Data are mean (standard deviation) for continuous variables. P values calculated using the t test and the chi-square test
  2. aPatients who had initially nonshockable rhythms and received no shock(s) during EMS resuscitation
  3. bPatients who had initially nonshockable arrest rhythms and subsequently received shock(s) owing to conversion to shockable rhythms during EMS resuscitation
  4. CPR cardiopulmonary resuscitation, EMS emergency medical service, N/A not available, PEA pulseless electrical activity