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Table 3 Consideration of relevant intra-abdominal conditions in randomized trials and meta-analyses concerning prone position ventilation

From: Clinical review: Intra-abdominal hypertension: does it influence the physiology of prone ventilation?

Study Pulmonary vs. extrapulmonary ARDS/ALI IAP BMI Free abdominal suspension?
Randomized controlled studies of ALI/ARDS/acute respiratory failure     
   Gattinoni and colleagues [4] 76% DP NR NR NR
   Guerin and colleagues [9] Partially reported NR NR NR
   Curley and colleagues [48]a 84% DP NR NR Suspended
   Papazian and colleagues [13] 79% DP NR NR No suspension
   Voggenreiter and colleagues [49] NR NR NR NR
   Mancebo and colleagues [10] 62% DP NR NR NR
   Chan and colleagues [14] 100% DP NR NR No suspension
   Demory and colleagues [51]b 91% DP NR NR No suspension
   Fernandez and colleagues [11] 65% DP NR NRc NR
   Taccone and colleagues [12] >65% DPd NR 25.3e No suspensionf
Other randomized controlled studies of prone ventilation     
   Beuret and colleagues [50]g NA NC NC No suspension
Meta-analyses     
   Alsaghir and Martin [7] NC NC NC NC
   Tiruvoipati and colleagues [8] Partiallyh NC NC NC
   Sud and colleagues [18] NC NC NC NC
   Abroug and colleagues [19] NR NC NC NC
   Kopterides and colleagues [17] NC NC NC NC
   Sud and colleagues [52] NC NC NC NC
  1. ALI, acute lung injury; ARDS, acute respiratory distress syndrome; BMI, body mass index; DP, direct pulmonary; IAP, intra-abdominal pressure; NA, not applicable; NC, not considered; NR, not reported. aPediatric study. bThree arms examining combinations of conventional, prone, and high-frequency oscillatory techniques. cIdeal body weight only reported. dSixty-five percent direct pulmonary, 6.5% sepsis and trauma, 23% other. eMean population BMI, but not controlled for. fEighty percent not possible to suspend, 20% not reported. gEvaluated prone ventilation in setting of coma. hExamines reporting of the most frequent cause of respiratory failure.