Volume 2 Supplement 1

18th International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Open Access

Cytokine removal from plasma of patients with SIRS by the Biologic-DTPF

  • H Levy1,
  • SR Ash2, 3,
  • J Steczko3 and
  • DJ Carr3
Critical Care19982(Suppl 1):P125

DOI: 10.1186/cc254

Published: 1 March 1998

The BioLogic-DTPF System uses a single lumen 10F venous catheter and combines a hemodiabsorption system using 2 l of sorbent suspension, flowing through the dialysate side of a parallel plate cellulosic dialyzer with whole blood perfusion on the blood side (the BioLogic-DT System), in series with a push-pull pheresis system (BioLogic-PF System). Bidirectional plasma flow (80–100 ml/min) across the 0.5 micron PF membranes provide direct contact between plasma protein and powdered sorbent suspension of either charcoal or charcoal and silica. In vitro tests using whole blood have demonstrated that the BioLogic-DTPF clears cytokines (TNF-α, IL-lβ, and IL-6) at a rate of 15–25 ml/min, without evidence of saturation of sorbent during 90 min run times. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) is the most common manifestation of cyrokine mediated disease in ICU patients. A Food and Drug Administration-approved Investiganonal Device Exemption permits a phase I preliminary safety and efficacy study of a single 6 h BioLogic-DTPF treatment of 8 patients with SIRS and organ failure due to sepsis.

Results

In treatment of 4 patients with charcoal, no adverse events occurred, hemodynamics were stabilized and less pressor agent was required. Cytokine levels decreased during treatment and remained significantly lower the next day.

The broad and nonspecific cytokine binding by the BioLogic-DTPF may quench both the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses of SIRS and prove beneficial in treatment of patients.

Result

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico
(2)
Purdue University and St Elizabeth Medical Center, West Lafayette
(3)
HemoCleanse, Inc

Copyright

© Current Science Ltd 1998

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